A Conversation with… Kristina Wiik

This time A Conversation with… checked out another one of our local developers and caught up with Kristina Wiik from our 28th graduating class.

  Tell me about what you are doing now in the Games Industry

I am now working as a game designer for United Front Games. This is a bit of a catch-all for me; I do a bit of everything within design and writing.

Read More

MOBA-land here we come!

Before I came to VFS I was working as an architect. I have always loved creating and design and I see programming as another form of making, and like architecture it shapes our world in meaningful ways.

Therefore, for me, the progression to programming has been a very logical one. There are the same management issues, maintainability issues, good practice, incorporating new technologies and human factors. What is different and I find incredibly fulfilling is that I no longer have to rely on a 3rd party construction team to realize the design, I can now built it myself.

Read More

Epic Tabletop Battles

From the beginning  of  January (Term 2), I have been taking part in the Role Playing Lab at VFS. The RolePlaying Lab consists of weekly sessions in which we meet to play table-top RPGs.

In the case of my group, we are playing a Dungeons & Dragons 3.5 campaign.

Although I have heard a lot about them, I had never got the chance to play a table RPG before. In some way I am glad because now I learned how to do it with an amazing Dungeon Master! Funny enough, our Dungeon Master is a VFS Graduate himself. Diego R. Pons graduated way back in 2006, in the 4th Game Design Class ( we are in the 40th class), and currently works at Next Level Games. Our DM plays all characters incredibly well, and is able to provide us with a deeply immersive experience both with his performance and the soundtrack and images he prepares.

Read More

function(ing){ in programming; }

I’m Meabh (Mave), I’m from Ireland and having been seduced by the magic of code I moved to Vancouver to study at VFS. I’m currently 12 weeks in to the still new Programming for Games Web and Mobile and have just reached the midpoint of term two. I’m tired, my brain doesn’t want to focus tonight and writing this much avoided blog post has a new appeal.

The course has at times been tough but that’s balanced by the pure joy experienced when things work. Last week when I finally got a full circuit of the server I am writing working I spontaneously whooped, more than once, over an hour period. This has never happen before as a result of schoolwork. PURE UNABASHED JOY. For me that is the nature of programming, when I’m making a large knowledge leap until I understand it and can make it work it feels like magic, evil, unforgiving magic. Then either by one or several small ‘ahhh moments’ it works and I suddenly feel like Hermione Granger, invincible. Until the next assignment comes along.

Read More

One does not simply choose the VFS life

I don’t really understand how I survived my first term in VFS, but I did it, and I’m alive – YAY!

…Well, I suppose I should introduce myself first.

My name is Andreia, 22 and I came from Portugal aaaaall the way to this side of Canada to study Programming for Games Web and Mobile at Vancouver Film School. While finishing my bachelor’s in Graphic Design I got really frustrated by not being able to actually make stuff happen and thus decided to learn Sorcery (aka Coding).

It has been a great adventure up until now, super far away from home, but it’s been worth it.

I’ve been around since October but haven’t really got the time to write something. So here it goes my review of the first term.

 

When I look back at the last 2 months this is how I would describe it:

(Programming students – and everyone around hearing them crying and eat ice cream – will get this)

Read More

A Conversation with… Shannon Lee

This week A Conversation with… reaches out to one of our first Women in Games Scholarship winners, and an alumni from our 16th graduating class, Shannon Lee.

 

  •  Tell me about what you are doing now in the Games Industry
    I’m currently working at BigPark Studios (Microsoft) as a Senior User Experience designer.

Read More

INTERVIEW: Eric Ford, Designer & Programmer of ‘Social Justice Warriors’

SocialJusticeWarriors

In Social Justice Warriors (SJW), the player takes on the role of an internet crusader, fighting trolls wielding popular fallacies such as “Argument from Self-Knowledge”, “Ad Hominem Attack” and “Argument from Incredulity”. Taking inspiration from traditional role-playing games, SJW features four player-classes: Paladin, Cleric, Mage and Rogue.

SJW_Screenshot

Each round the player deals one of four attacks to manage their sanity and reputation levels whilst simultaneously destroying those of their opponents. The game ends when the player’s sanity, reputation, or both, are destroyed.

Initially inspired by a picture of “social justice warrior videogame journalists to avoid” that was making the rounds on social media, the game is a satire on human interaction online and the pains of internet debates.

I spoke with Eric Ford (A.K.A. Nondecimal), designer and programmer of SJW, to find out more about the inspiration behind the game, the process of making it, and public reaction since releasing it and putting it on Steam Greenlight.

Read More

Interview: Anna Prein, Pi Jam Organizer and Time-Travelling Unicorn

 

With Pi Jam coming up this Friday, I sat down with organizer Anna Prein, a fellow 2013 Women in Games Scholarship recipient and current Vancouver Film School student to find out more about the jam, as well as the history of Hat Jam.

 

So what’s this thing you’re organizing?

It’s called Pi Jam. It’s a 48-hour game jam. It used to be called Hat Jam, VFS Hat Jam, but now we’re doing this with Microsoft so we wanted to change the name.

Read More

Winter Break 7 days 7 games

Happy new year and happy new term!

We are Team Flip from GD34. Daniel – level designer, Semin – Programmer, Nicha – Artist.

We are going to start developing the idea of our final project next term (Term4), so we planned to do a little exercise during our longggggggggggggggg winter break.

During the first week of winter break, we had a mini project called “7 Days 7 Games”, which means we made one game per day.

It’s for design exercise and learning new tools, trying new things. It’s quite tough to do a non-stop 7 day game jam, but it’s great valuable experience!

We also published our games on our website too. Please feel free to visit our site and have fun~!
http://7games.semplay.net/ 

Read More

Ludum Dare #28 – Mama is Sick [Post-Mortem]

Note: Ludum Dare is a quarterly game jam where participants from all over the world make a game from start to finish in 48 hours (competition mode) or 72 hours (jam mode). Guerric and I did the jam. The theme was ‘You Only Get One’. Entries are judged based on: innovation, fun, theme, graphics, audio, humor, mood and overall. Participants play and rate each others games. Results will be announced on January 5th, 2014.

‘Mama is Sick’ can be played HERE

 

My first Ludum Dare! And my second game jam ever.

This post will cover what mine and @GarrickWinter (Guerric Haché)’s game is about, a summary of the process we went about making it and the top 3 things done well and the top 3 things we could improve on.

Quick description of our game (taken from the instructions screen):

“Mama is Sick” is a resource-management, hard-times simulation game.

YOU ONLY GET ONE DOLLAR A DAY to look after your family (thanks to a generous family from overseas) while papa is away and mama is sick.

Buy food and water to make sure the food, water and health bars of you and your family don’t reach zero or death will occur.

If your education bar reaches zero, you won’t graduate high school.

You have to last 50 days until papa comes back. Will you manage to graduate? Will everyone survive?

You can work in a clothing factory to earn 50c a day, but be careful not to miss too much school. You also need to study at least three days a week or risk not being able to graduate.

Screen Shot 2013-12-16 at 5.49.59 PM

Read More