Game Art : A History

As a game artist, I’ve worked on many games in many genre’s over the last 20 years. I started with life drawing and portraits, and went onto Computer Aided Design (CAD) and technical drawing. Then I landed in the games industry in the earlier 90’s.

There have been staggering leaps in technology, especially for the game artists who produce the wonderful visuals, environments and characters that we have come to know and love. One area in particular is 2D art.

In 1994, I was creating textures for games on a Commodore Amiga, which was at the time, a very powerful 32bit computer. It had all of 8 megabytes of memory. That was a lot !!! The real win at the time was using an art program called Deluxe Paint created by Electronic Arts.
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A Tale Of Three Thursdays (…Plus One)

Siddharth Chinnakaruppan Rajendran

The major groundwork for this story was laid on the day before the First Thursday, when my portfolio instructor, Nicole Maas, came by my desk to review my progress. She saw my Manchester United themed workplace and liked that I’m into football (soccer for you North Americans). And I was glad she called it ‘football’. That’s when she suggested I email her my resume.

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VFS Grad Brian Hayes: From Scientist To Animator To Games Creative Director

Brian Hayes Creative Director, EA

Brian Hayes is a graduate of the VFS Classical Animation program, but he’s now a Creative Director at Electronic Arts, one of the biggest game companies in the world. He also started out as a scientist. So how does that work – going from scientist to animator to a creative director of games, working on such popular titles as Def Jam: IconFight Night Round 4 and Fight Night Champion? It sounded like an interesting journey, so we spoke with Brian to find out more about it.

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Game Changing : Thriving During Game Industry Seismic Shift

Games are changing.

The landscape once dominated by behemoth AAA titles is almost gone.

Gamers have more choices. Social games and free-to-play models have transformed the game industry you thought you knew. And ballooning budgets for high-profile titles mean you need a blockbuster of Modern Warfare proportions to turn a profit.

As The Verge wrote in their July 22nd article: “Developing an AAA game is rapidly becoming one of the most expensive enterprises humans can undertake, outside of building battleships, launching space vehicles, or making movies.”

But here’s the thing. For the emerging game designer — or animator or sound editor, for that matter — none of this a bad thing. It actually means opportunity.
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