Q&A with Maggie Wang

It is our pleasure to present to you another eye-opening interview we’ve had with one of our Digital Design alumni, Maggie Wang, UX/UI Designer at IUGO Care. Maggie gives us an insight in the creative process of her grad project BikeIt, including its challenges and results, and tips for current and future Digital Design students.

Can you briefly summarize what your project is about?
Bikeit is a mobile application that helps cyclists plan ideal cycling routes, find secure bike parking, and keep up with community events and news while being rewarded for helping to improve the urban cycling experience.

What inspired you to create your BikeIt?
I grew up in Taiwan and there were bikes everywhere. People there don’t just use bikes to commute, but also to shop, to meet friends, etc. So when I moved to Vancouver in 2004, I was surprised there were so few bikes around. Recently, however, there seem to be more; in fact, since 2010, the city has actively encouraged more people to cycle, as part of a commitment to a greener Vancouver. Most people can see the benefits of cycling, both for their health and for the environment. However, I’ve noticed that many people are still hesitant to ride a bike. For my grad project, I decided to find out why, and how to make things better.

What is your approach to solving a design problem?
My approach is to understand the problem through surveys and interviews. Many of the people I spoke with said riding a bike in Metro Vancouver is inconvenient, unsafe, and stressful, especially for beginner and recreational cyclists. My research also showed people wanted a convenient way to access cycling information, such as cycle routes, bike parking areas, and types of cycling gear.

How did you define success for the project and how did you measure it?
Within the timeframe I had, for me, success for this project meant seeing the focus groups testing a functional prototype, and receiving positive feedback from them (specifically, that they felt it would be a useful application that added value to their daily cycling routine).

Did you, at any point during the making of your BikeIt, felt lost and unsure on how to proceed? If so, what helped you get back on track?
Yes, there was time I felt lost and unsure, especially during the overlapping period of user testing and prototyping process. I had to analyze the user feedback and update the prototype accordingly, and at the same time I also needed to logically understand the differences between valid and invalid data and feedback. It was tough.  To help myself differentiate the usability of the data and define the core purpose of my application, I had to clearly understand my users’ daily cycling routine & behavior and speak to people who had several years of cycling experience or who worked in cycling-related industry.  Also, Keep one thing in mind: Creating a user centered design is not building a “Homer’s Car” (quote from my UX instructor: Krispian Emert)

What were the challenges that you needed to overcome when it came to designing?
My challenge was not only to create a user-friendly app that encouraged people to get on their bikes, but also to design it so that they would keep using the tool as they grew more confident about cycling. Using focus groups to try out my prototype, collecting their feedback, and making changes all along the process were all key to tackling this challenge.

To tackle the interface design challenge, I collected and analyzed information from city planners, local organizations, and bike-related businesses, as well as focus groups. I then came up with a variety of initial designs to test. After testing with my target audience and putting myself in their shoes, I kept the designs clean, simple and easy-to-navigate.

Where do you find inspiration for your creative design process?
Most of my creative design inspiration came from the process of understanding my users and researching cycling-friendly countries such as Norway, Germany and Spain.

What are some of the tools you used? Are there any tools you would recommend?
For me, the graduation project was an opportunity to try out different wireframing and prototyping tools. I used Proto.io, OmniGraffle and Axture for the overall interface flow. Pixate, and Principle for interaction effects. I found both OmniGraffle and Pixate intuitive to use. For wireframing and prototyping, I would recommend tools I discovered through work, after VFS: the combination of Sketch (w/ Craft Plug-in) + InVision.

Looking back, what would be one part of your project you would have done differently?
Exploring and learning new software within a tightly limited timeframe was an interesting challenge, but figuring out how to apply it correctly at different stages of the process requires practice time which I didn’t have. If I could go back again, I would have simplified the process by using Sketch (w/ Craft Plug-in) and InVision.

You mentioned that you were approached by the City Manager of Vancouver for Biko. What was the intent for the meeting?
Christopher, one of my VFS instructors, connected me with the City Manager of Biko (Molly E. M) through social media last year (Thank-you Chris). Molly had seen details of my BikeIt graduation project on my website, and was interested in finding out more about it. We emailed each other back and forth for a few months, then she asked if I might like to become a Brand Ambassador/City Coordinator with Biko.

However, I found out this role is focused on business development and sales, which are not really part of the career path I’m considering at the moment. So the position didn’t work out, but I’m still grateful to have met Molly, and to have discovered that there is a product similar to Bikeit already on the market. For me, this confirms concept approval for BikeIt. Interestingly enough, Biko and BikeIt were being developed at roughly the same time, which suggests there was a clear need for this kind of app.

What is Biko about and how is it different from Bikeit?
As I understand it, Biko is dedicated to creating a fun biking community and greener planet in various North and South American cities, including Vancouver, Mexico City, and Bogota, by rewarding people who ride their bikes. The main goal is to build a cycling network on a large scale.

In contrast, BikeIt was specifically designed for Metro Vancouver. Its main goal is to improve the urban cycling experience in our city by rewarding the cyclists who use this platform and helping them plan ideal cycling routes, find secure bike parking and keep up with local cycling news.

So, while both applications aim to create a greener environment, they are different in terms of scope. Also, BikeIt focuses more on safety and education while Biko is more about lifestyle – for example, the points you earn through Bikeit can only be spent on bike-related products and cycling lessons, but Biko points can be spent on anything, including drinks in the local pub.

What was your reaction when you found out that there was such interest following your grad project?
I was thrilled to hear people out in the “real world” were interested in my project. BikeIt was part of an academic program – the culmination of an intensive year at VFS – but throughout the development process I tried to be as practical as possible. The response outside the school really validated that I had succeeded in this goal.

Every so often, you get an opportunity to work on a project that can really make a difference – that has a positive impact on social causes and society at large. This kind of project is pure joy for me.  That is probably why I invested so much time and passion in BikeIt. BikeIt was much more than an assignment.

Do you have any advice for current students when it comes to choosing a topic for their grad project?
It always works better if you choose a topic that you are passionate about and feel connected to — ideally, you should have some previous experience with the “problem” that you want to solve.

Since you graduated, what sort of projects have you worked on?
I’ve worked on several native iOS mobile applications in the Real Estate, Custom Earphone, Health and Entertainment categories, as well as two responsive web design projects for BCCDC and City of Surrey. Also, a couple of digital media, data visualization and infographic projects for BCSTH, AWP and AIDA organizations.

How is it different to work on a project outside of VFS compared to the projects you have done in VFS?
The biggest difference between working at VFS and outside VFS is the motivation and intention. At VFS, you create things for your own interests; outside, you are working for clients. The strategies involved in understanding your hypothetical audience versus your client’s actual audiences are different.

Looking back at your year in the Digital Design program, what were the things that you appreciated the most?
The comprehensive program structure and the knowledgeable instructors.

What would be the one thing that you learned that you think helped you the most after you graduated?
Interface Design Principles and User Experience Design.

What is next for you?

To keep learning and creating meaningful products that have a positive impact on society.

Where do you get your inspiration?

I am constantly inspired by the world around me.  Colours, tastes, textures, perfumes – to me everything is alive with beauty and purpose.

What sort of things do you fill your head with?

Yoga and Meditation

What do you read?

I read mostly inspirational and spiritual books, ex. The Artist Way.  I’m currently reading: The Wave and The Light Between Oceans.

Do you subscribe to anything?

WIRED magazine, Flow magazine, Flipboard, TedTalks

What sites do you visit on the internet often?

Pinterest, Medium, Co.Design, UX Mastery, Kickstarter, Business News Daily

What music do you listen to?

It varies depending on my mood. Right now, I’m into Jazz, Indie pop and Folk.

What movies do you see?

Inspirational Stories, Dark Comedies, and Documentaries.

Do you look at art?

I like to visit local museums, art galleries, consignment stores and flea markets, especially when I’m traveling.

What do you collect?

I collect shells, stones, stamps, vintage posters and pens.

What’s inside your scrapbook?

Collages with Graffiti + random design ideas.

What do you pin to the cork board above your desk?

Postcards and sticky notes with inspiring quotations.

What do you stick on your refrigerator?

To Do list, and magnetic fridge poetry.

Who’s done work that you admire?

There are many people I admire. The top three would be Ansel Adams, Henri Matisse and Salvador Dali.

Who do you steal ideas from?

Bauhaus, Panda and Mother Nature 

Do you have any heroes?

Albert Einstein, Frida Kahlo and Lao Tzu

Who are the practitioners you look up to (have inspired me) in your field?

I look up to people who are passionate and intelligent. At the moment, my best professional role models are Katherine Dodds (Founder of Hello Cool World), Chris Hobbs, David Hobbs (Co-founders of Two Tall Totems) and Brian Chesky (Co-founder, CEO of Airbnb).

Thanks, Maggie!


DD SLAM: Futurism

(post by Grigor Cheitanov, Program Manager, Digital Design)

As part of their year at VFS Digital Design, the students have the unique opportunity to participate in a SLAM event. The event is a 45-hour challenge where students from all stages in the program get teamed up and are given a creative brief to execute. and is organized 3 times a year. SLAM offers the opportunity for students to test their skills, learn from their peers, and have fun thinking outside the box.

The latest event began with an evening kickoff by Louise Lee, Head of the Digital Design program at VFS, presenting the theme for the 1st SLAM challenge of the year – Futurism. Students were challenged to come up with a compelling motion design video as well as an interactive solution for a fictitious future brand. Following the presentation, students from all class groups were put in teams and quickly began brainstorming ideas. In the morning of the following day, the 5 teams presented their concepts to a panel of staff. For the concepts to be viable, criteria such as clear target audience, key message, art direction and solution to a problem have to be identified. Once approved, the teams then focused their efforts into production of their design solutions. In the afternoon of the final day, the teams present to all participants and staff. At the end of the final presentations, students and staff vote on their favourite solutions to the initial brief.

There were two categories for prizes – People’s Choice for participant’s votes and Critics’ Choice for Staff votes.  The winners of People’s choice were Adriana Tomaschett, Yi-Ting Hsieh, Mateus Linhares de Araujo, Julian Liao and Amara Kahlon for their brand package, landing page and motion design video promoting a 7 day trip in space onboard a state of the art cruise space ship. The winners of Critics’ choice were Tess Xie, Stuart Parker Irene Huang, Michelle Kang, Nizami Aghayev and Prity Pal for their solution for long distance relationships through the use of a 360 camera and an app interface that would allow the person who is away to be virtually immersed in events that their partners would like to share.

World IA Day

(guest post by Raji Keluskar and Michelle Kang)

World IA (Information Architecture) Day is an annual event that is held in over 50 cities in 29 countries and is held on the third Saturday of every February. The theme of the event this year was “Information Strategy and Structure,” and it was held at the VFS Digital Design campus in Vancouver. A number of students from the VFS Digital Design program volunteered to help out with the event and participating as student speakers. As students, we were looking forward to meeting the industry experts across different specialties, including the feature speakers such as Marianne Sweeny, Lorraine Chisholm, Melissa Breker, Hannah Wei, Robin Rozhon, Alan Etkin, and Karyn Zuidinga.

The Digital Design students who participated as speakers for the Lightning Talks were Gianna, Julian, Marly, Michelle, Raji, and Suzy. The Lightning Talks, a segment of the conference that features local community members who have managed to create synergy with unique and successful strategies in context of IA (Information Architecture) and UX (User Experience), was a chance for us to introduce ourselves to industry and talk about how, as students, we perceive IA. At first, we were nervous from the thought of having to talk about a subject that is still relatively new to us in front of an audience who we believed to be more knowledgeable about it. Thankfully, regardless of their status in the industry, the experts were curious to know the mindset of the upcoming talent. As we presented, we were glad to hear that they were more than happy to discover how each of us defined IA and our plans on catering to the users’ needs by integrating the practices of UX and IA.

Envisioning our futures in the field of interactive design and with Vancouver being the hub of it, World IA Day, with 107 attendees, was a great platform to start networking. We would like to thank the event organisers, Krispian Emert, Jessica Dill, and VFS Digital Design, for including us and giving us this rare opportunity to be part of such a great professional community. Thank you!

 

Studio Tour: Giant Ant

(guest post by Lizbeth Salazar, DD37)

On February 1st, my class DD37 and I, went to visit Giant Ant. We were really excited because most of us, leaning towards motion design, really wanted to visit a motion studio and the day finally arrived.

We walked together all the way to the studio, which is located at the end of Chinatown. Once we got there, I was not surprised about their office: I knew they were a small company and would have an office space to match. We went inside the studio and the first thing I saw was all the people immersed in their work, some using tablets, others on their computers with headphones on and others in the kitchen probably taking a short break. Whatever they were doing, they were really into it and they seemed happy.

We were directed to their conference room, and we were lucky to meet Jay Grandin, Partner and Creative Director of Giant Ant. Since we were a group of 18 people along with Jay, the room was crowded once we all sat down. He showed us some of their work and told us about how Giant Ant came to life.

We spent most of the time asking questions. The topics ranged from their process of design, the amount of time it takes them in creating their projects, and all the way to him telling us that he never planned on making motion design for living or even have a motion studio. He mentioned that most things happened in unusual ways and not in the way we have thought about them but if we are happy and we have an end goal, then we have to let whatever happens in the way flow and everything will work out in the end. And looking back at this point of his life, he is happy about where he stands and how things worked out.

By the end we asked him about tips or things we should think about if we really wanted to pursue motion design and he gave the following advice:

1. Create the storyboard as best as possible to avoid wasting time later in the process. The better it is, the less time you’ll put in it trying to refine it.

2. Throw as many ideas you and your team have, good and bad ideas. Combine them and if it works, you’ll have a really strong idea.

3. Forget about the money and learn. Do as much as you can. Do work you think has value and that way people will come to you.

Thanks, Giant Ant!

 

Studio Tour: DDB

(guest post by Marly Marquez, DD37)

After some days of sun, in early February, the first snowfall arrived in Vancouver and the visit of Class 37 to DDB was also held. On February 3th, the group met at 13:00 at the Digital Design campus to start their way to the studio. Between a snow storm and a snowball fight, we arrived to a beautiful building close to West Georgia Street.

After taking the elevator to the 16th floor, we reached a more comfortable atmosphere of creativity and design. Known as one of the best advertising companies in the world, the feeling of having arrived to a place where you would want to work in was felt by the whole group. Sara Caissie, the Account Supervisor at DDB, gave us a warm welcome and led us to a more pleasant place to talk about the company and answer our questions.

Stéphane, a Creative Director at DBB, joined Sara to discuss the company structure and share some of DDB’s projects. They introduced the different areas that exist in the company such as: Strategy planning & research, Traditional Advertisement, CRM (customer relation management), etc.

For DDB to continue to be one of the most recognized worldwide companies and at the same time be able to transmit the correct messages to the audience has been a challenge, but not impossible. They mentioned that in each project, they seek to create something unique as an experience for the users.

After a Q&A session, we started a tour around the floor where we saw the different workplace areas, brainstorming notes on the walls, card sorting, and other conceptual work. We also were able to enjoy the beautiful view that they have of the Vancouver Art Gallery plaza.

For their last motivational words, they told us to embrace criticism of our work to grow as designers and make our work better. For the future, they advised us to work as freelancers to build our industry profiles. DDB, like many companies, search for people with specific skills to work on projects. Also they invited us to send them our portfolios after finishing the DD program to see if they can offer us some internships.

All the 37’s want to give special thanks to Louise Lee for arranging the visit to DBB, to Danny Chan and Stephanie Wu for their patience and support and finally, but not least all, the staff of DBB for their advice and warm words.