Q&A with Ignacio Florez

We recently had a chance to speak to another Digital Design alumnus, Ignacio Florez, Graphic Designer and Videographer at TapSnap.

Can you briefly summarize what your grad project is about?
Poiesis” is a reflection on how we all have a creative side. Some of us have forgotten about it along the way for a number of reasons, but it is there. It is hard to do something and push yourself in a creative manner and in the end you can only keep on trying and doing your best.

How do you come up and define your story line?
I usually work with storylines but for this one I walked away from traditional storytelling and let it flow, almost like a poem. It was basically a voice trying to find the words to express what it meant to him or her what defines creativity and stumbling in the way.

What is the most important step that you think cannot be skipped when you are in the pre-production stage?
Pre-production is the most important phase of the whole process. I’d say one has to always respect the steps in order to get to where you need to be to jump straight into production. Having said that, for me the script is the backbone of every piece I make. No matter how amazing the art direction, animation or anything might be if the script is not powerful enough, everything collapses.

Do you have any tips and tricks that help you manage your scope and goals?
I try to keep my scope as realistic as possible. I come from a world of production and was a TV producer for a couple of years, I guess some of that stayed with me. I prefer having a concise simple piece than an ambitious over the top video that doesn’t quite accomplishes what it wanted to say. Furthermore, when you accomplish your goals fast you get the opportunity to work the project and keep making it as good as you can till delivery date.

How did you define success for a project and how did you measure it?
For me a personal project is successful when I feel that the message got across, when it transmits something.

Did you, at any point during your grad project, feel lost and unsure on how to proceed? If so, what helped you get back on track?
I felt lost throughout all my grad project but I embraced it from the beginning. It was kind of a meta experience: doing a project about how hard it is to be creative and working in a creative process. When it came to process it is again a matter of following the steps of pre-production, production and post as good as one can. You have to set dates, if you’re not happy by the time you should’ve had the final script, for instance, you’re just going to have to keep on going and making small changes along the way.

What are challenges that you need to overcome when creating a motion piece?
From the right art direction choices to establishing the scope of the project one keeps finding challenges throughout. However, with a good pre-production you can overcome these.

What are some of the tools you used? Are there any tools you would recommend?
I used tools from the Adobe suite such as Photoshop, After Effects, Premiere, Audition and also Cinema 4D. I’d recommend Grut Brushes for Photoshop to anyone trying to get a different feel on their digital painting, there are a bunch of other options out there too though.

Looking back, what would be one part of your grad project you would have done differently?
I had the crazy idea, at some point, of printing out every frame and painting them by hand and then going back to digital again. I didn’t do it because of time constraints but I would definitely want to try something like that in the future.

Do you have any advice for current students when it comes to choosing a topic for their grad project?
I’d say do something that feels genuine to you and something that challenges you, while keeping in mind your strengths. It’s not that much about exploring something to learn something new, it’s about making the best thing you can do with your current skills.

What is next for you?
After my year at VFS, it has been almost a year since I graduated, I haven’t stopped working on a number of projects. I love learning little things in each video that I do. Other than my Monday to Friday job I try to do as much freelance work as I can, mainly for non-profit organizations, there’s always more to learn.

What sort of things do you fill your head with?
Perhaps the things that I consume the most are music and movies. I come from a film background and I love getting inspiration from movies.

What do you read?
I tend to jump to different types of books in a random manner. I do find a lot of inspiration from books. I used to read mostly fiction but lately I’ve been having a lot of interest in human psychology, evolution and history. There’s a lot to learn and when it comes to information and general knowledge I always feel like I’m behind the rest. I have to keep on reading to catch up!

What’s inside your scrapbook?
My scrapbook is very personal and it holds a side of me that maybe reflects what I’d like for the future. It’s mostly random drawings which I do in my way to work. From cartoon characters to fast doodles that I do while watching people in the street.

Thanks, Ignacio!

Q&A with Henry Chu

We had a chance to speak to Henry Chu, UX Designer @ BigPark Microsoft Game Studio and DD alumnus, about his design process and his advice on graduate projects at VFS.

What is your approach to solving a design problem?
My approach varies depending on what the problem is, who it’s for and why is it a problem in the first place.  In general, I’d usually gather research, do interviews and ask questions to validate the problem we’re solving.  Once we have data that backs up the problem statement, then the creative process happens in ideating a solution, but that’s another long answer for another question.

How do you define success for a project and how do you measure it?
I believe a success of a project is defined by its impact on the users, user’s delightfulness using the product and how easy it was for them to use your features as designed.  Of course, there’s many more KPI’s that’ll determine a product’s success.

Did you, at any point while working on a project, feet lost and unsure on how to proceed? If so, what helped you get back on track?
While working on my graduate project at VFS, I was once doubtful if my design was the right solution for the problem.  However, with the process of quick prototyping and user testing, I was able to dismiss that concern.

Where do you find inspiration for your creative design process?
Inspiration comes from many different things for me.  I like to keep myself informed on many different industries that are semi-related to mine.  For example, I’d follow publications and posts about the latest tech and art trend, startup ideas and business strategies.  I look to other disciplinary work, such as industrial, architecture and motion design to fuel my inspiration and I have this weird habit of eyeing out bad (digital and analog) experience design in the world and thinking how to solve them.

What are some of the tools you used? Are there any tools you would recommend?
Mostly the usual Adobe creative suite programs.  Currently I’m learning Unity for mixed reality purposes and it’s a great tool for designing multi-reality experiences.

Do you have any advice for current students when it comes to choosing a topic for their grad project?
Be true to yourself and work on a project idea that inspires you.  Nothing sucks more than working on a project you don’t truly believe in yourself.  However, remember your graduate project is THE project to showcase all the skills you’ve learned during that one year in school.  So just make sure the topic you’ve chosen has a breadth of unexplored creative space for you to innovate and solve for.

Thanks, Henry!

UPCOMING DD TALKS EVENT: The Design Sprint

Our next Digital Design Talks event will be held on Wednesday, November 9th at 4:30pm!

Ainara Sáinz Gutierrez and Alejandra Porta from Unbounce will be presenting on how research makes great design possible.

Ainara’s Bio:
Ainara is a Vancouver-based Interactive Designer with a background in Graphic Design, who currently works in the Marketing Team of Unbounce. For the last four years she’s been working in multidisciplinary teams to convey intuitive digital experiences and products across web, tablet and mobile devices. She’s an art addict and believes that by experimenting and playing with design you can improve people’s lives.

Alejandra’s Bio:
Alejandra Porta is an Interactive Designer at Unbounce. She loves branding, typography, illustration and user research to create better UI experiences. After working as a surface designer and a soft good product developer for a few years, she realized she wanted to improve her digital design skills and this led her to VFS. Vintage shopping, art, bikes and lattes bring her joy as well as meeting and connecting people. She values being a great team player and is known to have a big heart.

 

Upcoming DD Talks event: Defining Your Voice

Our next Digital Design Talks event will be held on Thursday, September 1st at 4:30pm!

Roger Dario is a designer and art director in Toronto, Ontario. Currently, he is an Associate Creative Director at digital production company Jam3 where he leads design and conceptual strategy for interactive projects.

His clientele have included Google, Facebook, Spotify, Cartoon Network, Canon, Toyota, and Skittles, and he has received awards from D&AD, One Show, Cannes Lions, Clio Awards, FWA, Awwwards, ADCC, and FITC Awards, among many others. His work has been exhibited in Los Angeles, Toronto, and Vancouver, and has been published in several books and industry publications such as It’s Nice That, YCN, Applied Arts, Grain Edit, FastCoDesign, and Gizmodo.

Previously, he was a full-time freelancer and has worked with agencies and startups such as Buck, Bruce Mau Design, AKQA, BBDO, Cossette, Free Agency, Leo Burnett, Tribal DDB, Saatchi & Saatchi, Bench, and Format.
Parallel to his role at Jam3, he runs Material Object, a community print studio he co-founded with Marisa Torres. The studio’s current objectives are to investigate new print technologies both as a medium for publication and as an economical model for dissemination, and to offer a communal space for artists and writers to experiment and publish their work through the physical manifestation of print.

2016 ADOBE DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS: SEMIFINALISTS

The final batch of semifinalists was recently announced for the Adobe Design Achievement Awards. VFS Digital Design now has 17 nominated projects in total combined with the work previously selected in May. Good luck to all the recent graduates and current students!

Congratulations to the following semifinalists:

WHO’S NEXT CARE-Y?
Zora(Xue) Zhao

DRIVE FOR IMPACT – SOAP BOX DERBY FOR CHARITY
Kelly Kurtz
Saida Saetgareeva
Jason Chau
Nikki Ji
Sukhwinder Singh
Angelina Han

WAFFLE FACTORY
Ainara Sáinz

KINO
Ainara Sáinz

BRAVE NEW WORLD
Adriana Ogarrio

BETTER TOGETHER
Adriana Ogarrio